#SOL19 You Can Go Your Own Way


If you were looking at an Identity Web for me right now (Sara K. Ahmed's Being the Change has been on my mind with our recent #twtblog series and a book study/ workshop I facilitated with the Long Island Writing Project), you would see the added role of "Daisy Co-Leader" as another hat (or Girl Scout tunic?) I am wearing. My daughter, Megan, is a kindergarten student and I have signed on to be her Girl Scout troop co-leader. My fabulous friend and colleague (and down the street neighbor!) is the leader of the troop and she is everything you've ever dreamed of in a Daisy troop leader- enthusiastic, creative, organized, kind, thoughtful, and ambitious. Our troop has done A LOT in our short six months together. 

Last night was another Daisy event. We met up with other Girl Scouts from our town and the town right next to us for a "Paint Night." Each girl got a canvas and paints and was instructed, step by step, on how to make a snowman in a winter scene. It was meant to look somewhat like this:
Of course, everyone is different and the goal wasn't that they paintings were IDENTICAL...but kind of in the same ballpark? 

Megan was not having it. She told me before we even got to the event that "real artists don't follow instructions" and she was planning on "tweaking" it to make it her own. That she did. Her "snowman" at one point had long luscious flowing blonde hair before she added a brown burlap hat and then more swirls and paint that eventually blocked most of the hair. It was completely her own creation. I looked at some of other Daisies paintings that came far closer to the original. Some girls embellished with eyelashes or eyebrows but many looked similar to the intended finished product. Should I have steered Megan more firmly to comply with the step by step instructions?

Nah. 

She had a blast, asking me when the next Paint Night would be. She was proud of her creation, trying to decide the best place in our house to hang it. Sometimes, you have to go your own way. Megan's identity web would not only include "Daisy Scout" but "Artist" with a capital A. Maybe even "Rebel." 



Comments

  1. Great decisions- on her part and yours. Megan is the kind of brave girl we need! I love your connections to the identity webs you have been contemplating and the detail in how her painting evolved even before she started. Her snowman was surely more full of personality!

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  2. Go Megan. I think she has a very, very good point.

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  3. I'm pretty proud of Megan for asserting herself -- first in words and then in actions -- as an artist.

    Isabelle had a birthday party like this. I was worried that the instructor would be rigid and require everyone's paintings to look the same. The woman must know kids well since she gave them options at every stage of the process. And do you know what? Everyone's looked a little different at the end, but they were all incredible masterpieces!

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  4. We need more Megans in this world! Good for her!! I am a Girl Scout co-leader too! I would love to hear what your experience with this has been like!

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  5. I love this post and your girl! I'm not a fan of doing the same drawing/paintings even if it is in the spirit of learning. PS I did the GS leader thing for about 5 years. Lots of work and a little politics. Perfect for educators who are used to work and politics!

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